Home network security and digital literacy?

Our home networks have been ever growing.   Originally it was just having a basic network for a PC at home, which at the time was usually just a desktop connected to a dial up connection.    Now however, we have a host of devices, games consoles, personal devices and home appliances all on our home network, all adding to the complexity and therefore the security risk of our home networks.

Following on from our basic dial up connection our home network started to grow, first with the addition of Wi-Fi capability to allow internet access for laptops and also mobile phones.   Next, with the introduction of broadband and fibre, our children might have introduced a gaming system such as a PlayStation or Xbox into the house again linked to the network and the internet.   Next we start introducing networked and then Wi-Fi enabled printers before moving on to add home helper devices such as the Amazon Echo or Google Home.   We might even have added Internet of Things devices to our home network such as remote managed heating and lighting, or an internet enabled fridge freezer or kettle.    Internet enabled, and therefore network connected, surveillance may have been added in the form of a home security system or possibly a baby monitoring system.   The list of network connected home devices continues to grow and with that the complexity of our home networks.   They are now at a point where the complexity of a home network may equal or even exceed that of a small business network.

The issue here is security.      When we pick up our laptop to go on the internet to access our personal banking we assume it is safe to do so due to the various safety features on our laptop and on our Wi-Fi router.     We think about our security largely in terms of separate devices however our network security is largely based on the sum of all devices connected to the network.      Therefore, the more devices we have connected, the more complex the network becomes and the weaker the network security becomes.

Our network security is largely based on the security of the weakest devices.  So have we taken time when connecting a new device to review the available security options and to change the default passwords?    Actually, have we considered security when purchasing the device in the first place?    And in the longer term do we revisit the device and perform updates to ensure that the software on the device is such that any identified vulnerabilities have been addressed?

We talk about digital literacy and how we want our students to be literate in the use of technology however the security aspect of our home networks if largely overlooked.     The question is can you truly be digitally literate if you are using your home network without considering security?   Can you be digitally literate if you happily add additional devices to your home network without concern for the security implications?     Another question is where do we cover these issues in our teaching of digital literacy within schools?

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